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Looking for an Agile Developer

As Product Owner for the Scrum Breakfast Club, I want an Agile software developer,  At the Scrum Breakfast Club, our goal is to enable people and companies to become Agile. We need some software to help us make that happen. How do you find an Agile Developer?

When I have looked for a development partner in the past, I have always started what skills, passion and personality am I looking for.

First, let's talk about what this project is not:
  • This is not about creating a pretty website. This is about building the pipes between the various components.
If the following points describe you, we would like to talk to you (must):
  • We need to be able communicate in English. (I have tried working through an interpreter, but I have not found it to work well).
  • Our basic flow is Scrum and we do short sprints. We are not dogmatic, but we want to produce working software at least once per week. We would like you to know what Agile is about before we start.
  • Our Product Owner cares about quality and robustness. So we would like someone who is into TDD, BDD or one of their cousins. 
  • Interest in the work (which is mostly about the plumbing right now!). We are looking at making WordPress plugins for own use and other glue. So the basic skills are PHP and TDD or BDD.
If the following points describe you, you are in a great position to get the assignment.
    • Happy to work in a virtual team. Our team is based in locations from Europe to South East Asia. We use Skype, Hangout, Trello, and various cloud services. 
    • Happy with workloads of varying intensity. We have a clear project now, so you'll be pretty busy. I expect we are looking at a one to two month engagement. After that, we'll see. Maybe there will be phases where we are just in maintenance mode. We do expect a long life for our project and would like to come back to you when we need your skills again!
    • We would prefer someone is independent or in a small partnership. Someone who has control over their own time. You'll be dealing with Principals, and we'd like to deal with a Principal too. 
    • Last but not least, we are looking for good chemistry. We want work to be fun! Actually, this is a must, too!
    Does this resonate with you? Would you like to be collaborate with an Agile team?

    How to contact us

    Tweet a screen shot of your latest daily build or other evidence that you know how to build reliable code! Just include @peterstev and @bindzus and #SBCDEV in the tweet, and we'll reach out to you!

    Update 30.5.2016: Updated to better communicate our goals and priorities.


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