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Executive Education Workshop: Making the Entire Organization Agile

Mastering the Paradigm Shift to Radical Managementsm
May 21-23, 2012 in Washington DC

20 F Street NW is a
few blocks from the US Capitol
Photo courtesy alexabboud
Today’s white-water environment requires the entire organization to be agile. With the abrupt, unpredictable and simultaneous shifts in markets, customers, communications, technology, competitors, talent and regulatory frameworks, the entire organization must be nimble to survive, let alone prosper. In this three-day workshop (May 21-23, 2012 in Washington DC), you will find out how to accomplish the necessary paradigm shift in your organization.


The biggest secret in management today

Just over a decade ago, a set of major management breakthroughs occurred. These breakthroughs enabled software development teams to achieve both disciplined execution and continuous innovation, something that was hitherto impossible to accomplish with traditional management methods.

Over the last decade, these management practices, under various labels such as Agile, Scrum, Kanban and Lean, have been field-tested and proven in thousands of organizations around the world. Radical Managementsm distills, builds on and extends these principles, practices and values so that the entire organization can now achieve to apply the magic combination of disciplined execution and continuous innovation.

What will you learn in this workshop?

In this intensive, interactive three day Executive Education workshop, you will learn how to get beyond the rigidities of traditional management and acquire the breakthrough capabilities involved in making the entire organization agile. You will learn how to implement the elements of Radical Managementsm as an integrated whole so as to get extraordinary results for your organization, your customers and your workforce.

How will the learning take place?

You will receive both the theoretical grounding in the diverse principles and practices of Radical Managementsm and the hands-on experience of applying them to your organization. Learning through exercises, simulations, lectures, case studies and group discussions, you will emerge with a deeper understanding of the conceptual framework of Agile software development and Radical Managementsm and an enhanced capacity to make the necessary paradigm shift happen in your organization.

Who is right for this workshop?

Offering a career-changing experience for anyone dissatisfied with rigidities of traditional management, this leadership workshop is for:
  • Agile leaders and coaches wanting to convert the entire organization to Agile,
  • business leaders needing to understand Agile management or achieve continuous innovation,
  • public sector leaders seeking the agility to “do more for less”, and
  • entrepreneurs wanting to grow their startups without losing agility.

Who is giving the workshop?

The workshop is given by:
  • Steve Denning draws from his award-winning book, The Leader’s Guide to Radical Management, his path-breaking work in leadership storytelling and long managerial background as a director at the World Bank.
  • Peter Stevens draws on deep international hands-on experience in Agile and Scrum transitions, extending the breakthrough principles of Agile management from software development to the entire organization.
Eventbrite - Making the Entire Organization Agile This workshop is taking place on May 21-23, 2012 at 20 F St. NW in Washington DC. Sign up here now http://radical-management.eventbrite.com/ and/or call Peter Stevens at 240-472-5615 to get more information and a special pricing deal (quote code SD1)

What are the workshop objectives?

In this workshop, you will learn how to take the breakthrough lessons of Agile software development and apply them systematically so as to transform the entire organization.
You will learn how organizations like your own that have figured out how to get continuous innovation, and deep job satisfaction and delighted customers, and do this sustainably, as the permanent way in which the organization runs, all at the same time

  • You will learn how to extract what is valuable in 20th Century management while supplementing that with the new leadership practices that are needed to operate successfully in the tumultuous world of the 21st Century.
  • You will undergo a voyage of discovery, in which you will learn and embody a way of thinking, speaking and acting that is radically more productive for customers, employees and the organization. You will accomplish this by learning how to operate in a world of no-tradeoffs: how to get outsized outcomes for the organization along with inspired workers and thrilled customers and stakeholders.
  • You will learn how to accomplish these gains while creating authenticity in the workplace, both for you, for the people you work with and for, and for the people who work for you and for the organization’s brand.
  • You will learn what’s happening in other organizations along with the broader global movement for management change, epitomized in the Agile Manifesto (2001) for software development and the Stoos Gathering (2012) for general management.
  • You will learn how to get beyond instances of agility that are usually short-lived. You will learn how to expand oases of continuous agility, particularly in software development with the advent of Agile, Scrum, Kanban and Lean and eliminate the conflicts with the general management practices within the firm as a whole.
  • To make the entire organization agile, you will learn than new management tools. You will learn how to put in place together the right strategic goals, the right managerial roles, the right way to coordinate work, the right Agile values and the right way to communicate.
  • Understanding and implementing the comprehensive array of changes involved in making the entire organization agile will help you master the paradigm shift in management that is needed to create continuous innovation, delighted customers, passionate employees, and extraordinary shareholder returns.
These shifts require more than learning a few new tools or processes. They constitute a basic change in the way think, speak and interact with each other.

What participants say:

  • “Loved the exercises and activities”
  • “Really enjoyed the ideas behind it. I learned so much.”
  • “The high interaction and the moderation tools”
  • “It was great to have such variety in the different kinds of learning “I learned through leadership storytelling how to inspire desire for change”
Eventbrite - Making the Entire Organization AgileThis workshop is taking place on May 21-23, 2012 at 20 F St. NW in Washington DC. Sign up here now http://radical-management.eventbrite.com/ and/or call Peter Stevens at 240-472-5615 to get more information and a special pricing deal (quote code SD1)

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