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#stoos: Global Management Warming Starts in Switzerland



W. Edwards Deming wrote decades ago that bonuses are bad for business. But most managers around the world are still using them.

Peter F. Drucker said ages ago that knowledge workers cannot be subordinates of managers. But managers still treat their staff as subordinates.

Dan Pink spoke on TED about motivation: what science knows and business ignores. Research tells us again and again that performance appraisals don’t work. But many companies keep relying on them as their primary evaluation technique.

Why? Why is management frozen and inflexible? Why is management changing so slowly?

10 years ago, the Agile Manifesto ignited a world-wide revolution in software development. Granted, the agile movement is still a work-in-progress. But we have made a lot of progress!

However, it seems the Arctic Ocean will have melted before we see traditional management replaced with a more functional paradigm. The rate at which it happens now is certainly not the same rate as the adoption of Scrum and Kanban. And companies are dieing as a consequence.

Is it too slow? Yes!!

Can we heat it up? Well, let’s talk about that…

The Stoos Gathering

Steve Denning (@stevedenning), Jurgen Appelo (@jurgenappelo), Franz Röösli (@roeoesli), and Peter Stevens (@peterstev) are bringing together a group of 20 thought leaders from around the world in Agile, Lean and Business leadership. It will be a 2-day gathering in Stoos, Switzerland on January 6-7, 2012. Our goal is to discuss how to accelerate the transformation of management around the world.

“We are looking to energize organizations in ways that make them better for the organizations themselves, better for the people doing the work, better for those for whom the work is being done, and better for society as a whole. And we want to understand how we can speed it up!”

Ideas for improving organizations have been around for decades. And yet, very little has happened. Change in business management is happening at a glacier pace. Can we help accelerate the transformation of the way organizations are run? Can we heat things up? Is there something that everyone can subscribe to and that will energize the movement for global change?

Is that something a repeat of solutions past solution? Surely not! Will it build on experience from around the world? Most definitely! Can you be part of it? Absolutely!

Help us prepare!

We are looking for your thoughts on how to energize and catalyze a global movement for organizational transformation. We recognize that all thought leaders have their own brands and flavors of management, but at the same time we see all our efforts as part of something larger.

Something global.

Something warmer.

Can you help us?

Please give us your input, in less than 100 words, here on my blog, or on Steve’s blog, or on Jurgens's blog, or via email. We will make sure your information is prominently radiated during the discussions in Stoos. Help us to stimulate our brains and contribute to a positive outcome of the Stoos Gathering.

Let’s generate some global management warming!

Send us your input and follow #stoos to stay involved.

Comments

Scott C. Schuck said…
Nearly all remedies I've read rely, primarily, on logical, rational (Newtonian/linear) – largely the same approach that is inadequate in facing the impending chaos.In the "new" reality – Quantum processes – organic and interdependent which self-organize when under minimal constraint.
This is best learned through visceral experience. The path forms only when we walk along it.
The best exposition of this new view is Margaret Wheatley's "Leadership and the New Science: Discovering Order in a Chaotic World".

Perhaps the best "fallback" approach is that of the "World Cafe'" It's sort of a 'structured path to openness", i.e., emergence.(David Issacs & Peter Senge endorse this process. Good Luck!
skot4trust

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