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Showing posts from September, 2014

Tackle your organization impediments with 59 minute sprints!

As a comment on "How much do you let a new team self organize?" IanJ asked
Why are 59-Minute Scrums cool and what are they good for? The 59 Minute Scrum has been a popular training exercise for years in the Scrum community. The team gets a problem to solve, and goes through a "simulated" sprint to solve the problem. You get to experience real Scrum in a safe environment.

Fifty-nine minute sprints are an excellent learning tool because so much happens in such a short time. Everything that goes wrong in a real sprint can happen in a 59-minute sprint.  They are great for problem solving!

In my classes, I usually simulate a 3-day sprint, using 5 minutes for each half of the Sprint Planning and the Sprint Review, 12 minutes for each day, and 4 minutes for each daily scrum. If you add it up, it comes to 59 minutes. Each Scrum Team has a Scrum Master, a Development Team and a Task Board. Depending on the context, there may be one Product Owner for all the teams in the roo…

On the road to high performance teams

I have been thinking about continuing education for Scrum Masters.

The objective of a Scrum Master is to create a high performance team, which is in turn part of a high performance organization. So both team and Scrum Master must develop their skills moving forward. Just facilitating the Scrum meetings won't get you there.

The Scrum Alliance has defined the Certified Scrum Professional (CSP) program. This is the journeyman-level Scrum certification (think Apprentice -- Journeyman -- Master ). This certification is not achieved by passing a test, but rather by demonstrating a commitment to Scrum by doing Scrum and learning about Scrum.

How do you achieve the continuing education needed to achieve journeyman status? My answer is the Scrum Breakfast Club. The Scrum Breakfast Club is an inexpensive, recurring open-space format for solving problems related to Scrum and Scrum Projects (and learning advanced Scrum as you do). You bring your problems and find solutions, with …

Getting Starting on #POcampCH -- the Product Owner Camp Switzerland

Today, the organization team for the first Product Owner Camp in Switzerland, held its first telco. Here is what we decided:
Our target date is March 2015, the alternative is June, 2015.The open space will be held on a Friday and Saturday.We want to hold a Product Owner Masterclass, one or two days before the Open Space event.The audience is experienced Product Owners, Agile Product Managers and Lean Startup Practitioners. This is by practitioners for practitioners, not for beginners.The event is not profit oriented. We are going to get together on skype roughly once every to two weeks to take the event forward. We are thinking hotel in the mountains, we will start exploring possibilities once the constraints for the workshop are defined. 
We have created a backlog to organize our work: Our first objective is the find a leader for the MasterClass, reserve some dates, and start working on the website. After that, priority will be the venue...

Several other people expressed an in…

How much do you let a new team self organize?

I have a team of 11 developers and 3 Product Owners. Their ideas about how to organize the team are all over the place. Some want to do 1 week sprints. Others want one month sprints. And we pull in resources people so we can get the right velocity to meet our deadlines. This seems like a mess. How much should I let my beginning team self-organize? -- recently asked on a Scrum Discussion Forum.     Modifying a complex technique before you have mastered it is a failure pattern. So when you are just getting started, try to get as close to Scrum by the book as you can, without obsessing over it... much. I call this Pretty Good Scrum(tm). ;-)

Yes the team self-organizes... and the Scrum Master is charged with teaching the team and helping them improve. When the team is just getting started, it should follow the lead the of Scrum Master, and the Scrum Master should stay close to the book. As they get better, they'll be better able to inspect and adapt themselves.

Successful teams learn…

Pair & Share - a simple technique for Sprint Planning

How do you get the team to plan tasks effectively? The second half of sprint planning is often a challenge for teams starting Scrum. It used to be their Project Leader would do the planning for them. Now the team has to figure it out for themselves! (Doesn't the Scrum Master do that? No!) How can you as a Scrum Master encourage your team to plan the Sprint effectively?

Many teams have difficulties doing task planning before they have thought about the technical concept. To address this challenge, I have a strategy I call "Pair and Share".
Preparation Good preparation is half the battle. This means that coming out of Sprint Planning 1, you should have a selected product backlog ("forecast") that consists of reasonably small stories. Six to 10 items in the forecast is a sign that the stories were small enough (assuming it is a good forecast).

Your team has had the conversations with the Product Owner, the Stakeholders, other Subject Matter experts, etc, and the …

Frameworks considered helpful

Jurgen Appelo recently wrote:

I know of no industry in the world that is as infested with methods and frameworks as the software business. Whether it’s RUP, XP, Scrum, AUP, DAD, or SAFe, it seems IT businesses are always looking for yet another method or framework that they can “implement” next month.
As a retailer, how often do you come into contact with filmmaking? Not very often. How often do you come into contact with road building? Except when you are stuck in traffic due to a construction site, not very often.

How often do you come into contact with IT? Every business comes in contact with IT. Whether to sell on online, automate processes, manage work, or whatever, every IT and software are everywhere. And IT projects can be extremely complex and failure is quite common.

And IT is so widespread, there aren't enough experts to go around -- or why does Jurgen tour the world to promote his book and his framework, instead of working with individual companies to help them improve…

Scrumbut, or What could you omit from Scrum?

Jelle van Wieringen recently wrote on LinkedIn:
Next Monday in Mannheim, Germany we will discuss Scrumbut in our open monthly "Scrum Stammtisch". This months topic is the consequences of leaving out elementary elements of Scrum. I'd like to know what [people] think... As perhaps the first person to ask people to take the Nokia test in public, I feel a little bit responsible for the creation of the term "ScrumBut." Is it OK to change Scrum? Certainly there are situations where necessary, and others where it's not OK (and probably some overlap between the two!), so here is my take on changing Scrum:

The core of Scrum is really very small. Inspect and Adapt. At regular intervals. Everything thing Scrum is designed to enable effective inspection and adaptation at regular intervals.

To me, Scrum represents a solution to the challenge of solving complex problems based on those simple principles. It's a reference implementation. You'll never do it exactly …