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Showing posts from November, 2012

How do I do #Stoos in my company?

Monday, Steve Denning and I held our Monthly Mashup webinar dedicated to the question, "What is Stoos?" If you haven't followed the linkedin discussion, I urge you to check it out! In any case, one of our participants, Gary from Chicago asked: I am in the process of forming a new company which will operate in a niche within the chemicals industry.   I am not looking to change my organization, I am looking to start my organization using Stoos, Agile and Radical Management from the outset.  It would be helpful to know who within the global Stoos network might be available to consult regarding my startup keeping my developing organization on the path of being customer focused with empowered employees. Great question! A couple of answers came back:
Several of the panelists are in that business (surprise!). For example, Steve & I teach a course on Radical Management. I also teach Scrum and lead Temenos visioning retreats to enable your your leadership team to create a com…

Sample Definition of Done

Why does Scrum have a Definition of Done? Simple, everyone involved in the project needs to know and understand what Done means. Furthermore, Done should be really done, as in, 'there is nothing stopping us from earning value with this function, except maybe the go-ahead from the Product Owner. Consider the alternative:
Project Manager: Is this function done?
Developer: Yes
Project Manager: So we can ship it?
Developer: Well, No. It needs to be tested, and I need to write some documentation, but the code works, really. I tested it... (pause) ...on my machine. What's wrong with this exchange? To the developer and to the project manager, "done" means something rather different. To the developer in this case, done means: "I don't have to work on this piece of code any more (unless the tester tells me something is wrong)." The project leader is looking for a statement that the code is ready to ship.

At its most basic level, a definition of Done creates a sh…

What is the role of a Business Analyst in Scrum?

When I teach a CSM class, my goal is that my participants go home delighted (and of course that they learn about Scrum, that they are motivated to do Scrum, and can pass the online CSM exam). So after every class, I ask for feedback, in particular what could I do to get a better score. And for the next class, I strive to implement or address two or three of the points raised by my participants.

One issue that was raised was unanswered questions. It is annoying to ask questions and not get answers! Time is limited, so it is not always possible to answer all questions, so I thought, why not answer them on my blog? So here goes, first question:
What is the role of a Business Analyst in Scrum? This question is a challenge because Scrum doesn't answer this question! Scrum is a simple, team-based framework for solving complex problems. The roles and ceremonies in Scrum are designed to ensure that inspect and adapt can occur regularly with complete and correct information. Scrum does not…