Skip to main content

Scrum Breakfast in Zürich, 4. Feb 2009:
Team-Building without wanting to understand team-building theories

Our next Scrum Breakfast is focused on the softer skills of project management. Under the title

Team-Building without wanting to understand team-building theories

Hans-Peter Korn, independent Coach & Trainer, CSM, and regular Scrum Breakfast participant will help us deal with the complexities of dealing with a team.

Abstract

In your role of a Scrum Master you want to sustain individuals to think and work as a team. Are models and theories describing how individuals and teams are "functioning" necessary to moderate the human interactions  within  the team?  No, you can moderate teams in a simpler way. By following models and theories you risk to observe and boost in first instance that, what should happen following the models and theories - and not the actual intentions of the individuals in the team.

Instead of theory driven interventions you can accept teams as complex social systems with an unpredictable behaviour.  And you can observe unprepossessed and curiously all what's already working well (even in some degree only) and you can appreciate this to preserve and strengthen it. How does this look like specifically? How, for example, can this be supported by the "three question" in the "Daily Scrum", by the "burn down charts" and by dealing with "impediments"?  Guidance for Scrum Masters or Agile Coaches.

I look forward as always to interesting discussions about an interesting topic!

Registration

The Scrum Breakfast is organized in cooperation with the SwissICT Lean Agile Scrum Working Group.

As usual, namics provides location, coffee and croissants. swiss IT bridge enablesthe webinar. Active and interesting discussions are a given!

Doors open at 8.00, Presentation starts at 8.35 (so you can catch a train which arrives at or before 8.30 and make the start of the presentation.

Continue to:

Comments

dbu said…
seems there is a lot of demand for this event. swissict wrote me that the breakfast is full and i could not attend locally. to bad i waited until last weekend to subscribe...
Peter said…
Yes, the response has been unprecedented! I say this with both :-) and :-(. Fortunately, we have the webinar so you can still participate.

And you can join the Swiss Lean Agile Scrum Community online. Register here.

Popular posts from this blog

Sample Definition of Done

Why does Scrum have a Definition of Done? Simple, everyone involved in the project needs to know and understand what Done means. Furthermore, Done should be really done, as in, 'there is nothing stopping us from earning value with this function, except maybe the go-ahead from the Product Owner. Consider the alternative:
Project Manager: Is this function done?
Developer: Yes
Project Manager: So we can ship it?
Developer: Well, No. It needs to be tested, and I need to write some documentation, but the code works, really. I tested it... (pause) ...on my machine. What's wrong with this exchange? To the developer and to the project manager, "done" means something rather different. To the developer in this case, done means: "I don't have to work on this piece of code any more (unless the tester tells me something is wrong)." The project leader is looking for a statement that the code is ready to ship.

At its most basic level, a definition of Done creates a sh…

Scaling Scrum: SAFe, DAD, or LeSS?

Participants in last week's Scrum MasterClass wanted to evaluate approaches to scaling Scrum and Agile for their large enterprise. So I set out to review the available frameworks. Which one is best for your situation?

Recently a number of approaches have started gaining attention, including the Scaled Agile Framework ("SAFe") by Dean Leffingwell, Disciplined Agile Development (DAD), by Scott Ambler, and Large Scale Scrum (LeSS), by Craig Larman and Bas Vodde. (Follow the links for white papers or overviews of each approach).

How to compare these approaches? My starting point is Scrum in the team. Scrum has proven very effective at helping teams perform, even though it does not directly address the issues surrounding larger organizations and teams. An approach to scaling Scrum should not be inconsistent with Scrum itself.

Scrum implements a small number of principles and constraints: Inspect and Adapt. An interdisciplinary Team solves the problem. Deliver something of va…

Explaining Story Points to Management

During the February Scrum Breakfast in Zurich, the question arised, "How do I explain Story Points to Management?" A good question, and in all honesty, developers can be an even more critical audience than managers.

Traditional estimates attempt to answer the question, "how long will it take to develop X?" I could ask you a similar question, "How long does it take to get the nearest train station?

The answer, measured in time, depends on two things, the distance and the speed. Depending on whether I plan to go by car, by foot, by bicycle or (my personal favorite for short distances) trottinette, the answer can vary dramatically. So it is with software development. The productivity of a developer can vary dramatically, both as a function of innate ability and whether the task at hand plays to his strong points, so the time to produce a piece of software can vary dramatically. But the complexity of the problem doesn't depend on the person solving it, just …